Wedding Jewellery Box

June 2005

Jewellery box, closed

Jewellery box, closed

I made this as a wedding present for Jarkwoman and Jarkman.

Jewellery box, open

Jewellery box, open

It's a very simple jewellery box, the intention being to have some subtle shaping and detailing to give it character, rather than extravagant shape.

Jewellery box, open

Jewellery box, open

There's a deliberate contrast between the pale timber of the body and the dark lid.

Front corner, showing the scalloped lid and dovetailed joinery

Scalloped lid and dovetailed corner

Some inspiration for this box came from a book of Krenov's, showing work by his students. I liked the idea of a scalloped lid.

Front corner

Front corner

Rear corner, showing dovetails and hinge pin

Rear corner, showing dovetails and hinge pin

To add extra detail, I left the pins of the corner dovetails proud and carefully chamfered.

Inside the lid, showing the ray-flake figure in the oak

Inside the lid

The lid is made of English brown oak, a well-figured and well-coloured timber, without any further treatment. The pieces for the lid were carefully quarter-sawn to show oak's typical ray-flake figure.

Lid, showing the scalloped top

Scalloped top of the lid

The outside of the lid has a shallow curve, cut into deep crosswise scallops. They give an interesting wave pattern to the flake pattern.

Signature monogram on the lid edge

Signature

Internal dividers

Internal dividers

There are internal dividers to make a couple of small compartments, with removable padded lids for further storage.

The base is lined with raw linen.

Construction

Materials: English ash, brown oak. Both locally felled.
Finish is blonde shellac on the ash, oil and shellac on the oak.

Overall size, approx 15" x 11"

Apart from initial stock dimensioning, it's nearly all hand-work. The dovetails are hand cut, as are the scallops in the lid. I cut the scallops by marking out pencil lines and clamping a straight batten adjacent to each one. I then used a wooden moulding plane, a simple cove smaller than the scallop. By tilting it by hand and carefully watching the shape develop, I shaped each scallop by eye.